ASTROMETRICAL OBSERVATIONS OF THE FAR SATURN AND JUPITER SATELLITES

As a part of the improvement of satellites and planets ephemerides and the comprehension of the dynamic of solar system, we carry out astrometrical observation campaigns at the Haute-Provence Observatory, in particular for the distant satellites of Jupiter and Saturn little observed and badly known. Please refer to the scientific pages of this website (GAP team of the IMCCE) for more details on completed works.

This page presents obtained images during the observation campaigns. Unless otherwise specified, these images, of which field of sight is 12 minutes of degree, were carried out with the 120 cm telescope of the OHP.



A succession of three rough pictures of field of J-6 (Himalia) on December 16, 1998 highlighting the movement of this satellite. The luminous halo in top on the left comes from Jupiter which is at 50 minutes of degree towards the west. The magnitude of Himalia is 14.8; the exposure time is 60 seconds in R filter.




J-6 (Himalia) on December 16 1998

Succession of three rough pictures of field of J-9 (Sinopé) on December 16, 1998 highlighting the movement of this satellite. The luminous halo in top comes from Jupiter which is at 27 minutes of degree towards north. The magnitude of Sinopé is 18.3; the exposure time is 360 seconds in R filter.




J-9 (Sinopé) on December 16 1998

Succession of three rough images of field of J-11 (Carmé) on August 18, 1998 highlighting the movement of this satellite. Jupiter, which is at more than one degree, does not diffuse an awkward light. The magnitude of Carmé is 18.0; the exposure time is 400 seconds in R filter.




J-11 (Carmé)on August 18 1998

Rough image of field of J-11 (Carmé) on December 16, 1998 highlighting the movement of this satellite. The luminous halo at the bottom on the right comes from Jupiter which is at 16 minutes of degree. The magnitude of Carmé is 18.0; the exposure time is 600 seconds in R filter.




J-11 (Carmé)on December 16 1998

Rough image of field of J-12 (Ananké) on August 18, 1998. The luminous halo at the bottom on the left comes from Jupiter which is at 15 minutes of degree. The magnitude of Ananké is 18.9; the exposure time is 300 seconds in R filter.




J-12 (Ananké) on August 18 1998

Rough image of field of J-13 (Léda) on August 18, 1998. The luminous halo on the left, as well as the multiple reflections comes from Jupiter which is at 40 minutes of degree. The magnitude of Sinopé is 20.0; the exposure time is 900 seconds in R filter.




J-13 (Léda) on August 18 1998

Rough image of field of S-9 (Phoebe) on August 18, 1998. Saturn is at 30 minutes of degree. The magnitude of Phoebé is 16.5; the exposure time is 180 seconds in R filter.




S-9 (Phoebe) on August 18 1998

Double rough image of field of S-9 (Phoebe) December 16, and 17, 1998. Saturn is at 34 minutes of degree. We can see the field from one day to another, which shows the weak displacement of Phoebe. The exposure time of the image of left is 200 seconds; the one of the picture of the right is of 60 seconds.




S-9 (Phoebe) the December 16 and 17

Characteristics of the far satellites systems of Jupiter and Saturn.

Jupiter has two families of small and distant satellites having a strong declination on the Jupiter equator: families of Himalia and Pasiphae, whose rotation around Jupiter is retrograde. The table below presents the members of these 2 families.

Himalia Family Pasiphae Family
J-13 Léda a = 11.15 Mkm M = 20.0
J-6 Himalia a = 11.443 Mkm M = 14.8
J-10 Lysithée a = 11.7 Mkm M = 18.4
J-7 Elara a = 11.716 Mkm M = 16.8
J-12 Ananké a = 21.048 Mkm M = 18.9
J-11 Carmé a = 23.28 Mkm M = 18.0
J-8 Pasiphae a = 23.658 Mkm M = 17.0
J-9 Sinopé a = 23.848 Mkm M = 18.3

Saturn has only one known distant satellite: Phoebe (S-9), whose equatorial radius is of 12.893 Mkm and of which the magnitude is of 16.5.

Caution : This Website was created with the Ministère de l'Education Nationale, the CNRS and the CNES support. Any use of the data published on this website requires the IMCCE agreement..